MSPTM 2019 Annual Scientific Conference
13 - 14 March 2019
InterContinental Kuala Lumpur

Abstract

Title

ANTIBODY SEROCONVERSION RATE: A TOOL FOR SEROLOGICAL SURVEILLANCE OF MALARIA TRANSMISSION INTENSITY

Type
Oral Presentation - Invited Speaker
Theme
Scaling Up Efforts in Tropical Disease and Vector Control through Evidence-Based Research
Topic
Malaria

Authors

Main Author
Zulkarnain Md Idris1
Presenting Author
Zulkarnain Md Idris1
Co-Author

Authors' Institution

Department / Institution / Country
Department of Medical Parasitology and Entomology / National University of Malaysia / Malaysia1
Content
Abstract Content
Malaria transmission intensity is an important determinant of the burden of malarial disease. To estimate the burden of malaria disease, or evaluate the likely effects of control strategies, require reliable prediction of transmission. It has long been suggested that antimalarial antibody prevalences i.e. seroprevalence, could provide a more accurate estimate of transmission intensity than traditional measures such as entomological inoculation rates (EIR) or parasite prevalence (PR). When combined with age, seroprevalence allows retrospective examination of exposure history of population living in malaria endemic areas. Recent mathematical modelling and technical advances in high-throughput diagnostic platforms have produced a number of transmission metrics including the seroconversion rate (SCR) that are suitable for various transmission settings. Alternative tool for surveillance of malaria transmission intensity based on antibody seroprevalence and the SCR that exploit human antibody responses to characterize previous parasite exposure and are specific to a particular antigen or combination of antigens. Serological data from over 5000 individuals in Kenya (Africa) and Vanuatu (Oceania) have been analysed involving research groups in eight countries, providing significant evidence in exposure variation of different Plasmodium parasites, temporal changes in malaria transmission and evaluation of control interventions.
Keywords: Malaria; Serology; Transmission
Requires Audio or Video system for Presentation?: Yes