MSPTM 2019 Annual Scientific Conference
13 - 14 March 2019
InterContinental Kuala Lumpur

Abstract

Title

A STUDY ON THE PREVALENCE OF PARASITIC PROTOZOAN AMONG STRAY CATS IN SELANGOR-MALAYSIA

Type
E-Poster Presentation
Theme
Scaling Up Efforts in Tropical Disease and Vector Control through Evidence-Based Research
Topic
Medical Microbiology & Parasitology

Authors

Main Author
Hassanain Al-Talib1
Presenting Author
Hassanain Al-Talib1
Co-Author
Fazila Ibrahim2
Muhammad Sufyan Mohd Mansor2
Nadia Fatihah Roslan2
NurHafeefa Suraya Zait2
Nurulhuda Amran2

Authors' Institution

Department / Institution / Country
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology / Faculty of Medicine - Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) / Malaysia1
Faculty of Medicine / Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) / Malaysia2
Content
Abstract Content

Objective: To study the prevalence and types of protozoa in stray cats’ faeces.

Method: A total of 100 fresh cats' faecal samples were collected in a clean, wide-mouthed container and were brought back to the lab on the same day of collection, preserved in 10% formalin and kept in a refrigerator at 4°C. Faecal samples were concentrated using Parasep tube then centrifuged and microscopic examinations of the sediments were performed. Faecal samples were stained with iodine and examined for presence of protozoa. Identification of intestinal protozoa were done based on morphology and size of specific species through microscopic examination.   

Result: The prevalence of stray cats shedding intestinal protozoa was 73%. Five different protozoa were detected in cat faeces, including Toxoplasma gondii, Isospora felis, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Tritrichomonas foetus. The highest rate of protozoa detected was Isospora felis (59.62%), followed by Toxoplasma gondii (30.77%), Entamoeba histolytica (3.85%), Giardia intestinalis (3.85%), and Tritrichomonas foetus (1.92%). Among single protozoa in cat faeces, Isospora felis have the highest rate (37%) followed by Toxoplasma gondii (9%) and Entamoeba histolytica (2%).

This study showed single protozoa from faecal samples were more common (48%) than mixed protozoa (25%). In mixed protozoa both Toxoplasma gondii and Isospora felis were most prevalence in cat faeces (19%).

Conclusion: The prevalence of intestinal protozoa among stray cats is still in high level. This highlights for more preventive and control measures, supported by veterinarians and health organizations. Further research is needed to investigate the genetic diversity of human protozoan, which may be shared with stray cats. These studies could provide information on the dynamics of parasitic infections between stray cats and domestic populations and enable the development of more effective control strategies.

Keywords: Protozoa; Cat Faeces; Zonosis; Toxoplasmosis
Requires Audio or Video system for Presentation?: No