MSPTM 2019 Annual Scientific Conference
13 - 14 March 2019
InterContinental Kuala Lumpur

Abstract

Title

GASTROINTESTINAL PARASITES ON CAPTIVE ORANGUTAN (PONGO PYGMEAUS) FROM EX-SITU CAPTIVE CENTER, PERAK, MALAYSIA

Type
Oral Presentation
Theme
Scaling Up Efforts in Tropical Disease and Vector Control through Evidence-Based Research
Topic
Veterinary Parasitology

Authors

Main Author
Nurhana Halim1
Presenting Author
Hani Kartini Agustar1
Co-Author
Badrul Munir Md-Zain1
Sabapathy Dharmalingam
Hani Kartini Agustar1

Authors' Institution

Department / Institution / Country
Department of Environmental Science and Natural Resources / Univerisiti Kebangsaan Malaysia / Malaysia1
Content
Abstract Content
Studies on parasites infecting non-human primates are essential to better understand the potential threat to humans of zoonosis transmission, particularly under the ecotourism industry where the animals is contained within a small enclosure. In the ever increasing visitors of ecotourism site, there is a possibility in an increase of incidence of human-primate contact. Therefore, it is important to identify potential parasitic infections that can be transferred from humans to primates and vice versa. In this study, the two groups of orangutan in Bukit Merah Orangutan Island and Taiping Zoo were investigated to assess the prevalence and richness of gastrointestinal parasites and heamoparasites. Total of 34 fecal samples were collected between April 2017 and January 2018 from 21 individuals of Bornean Orangutan. Direct smear, fecal flotation, fecal sedimentation and modified Trichrome staining method were used to identify presents of helminthes and protozoa based on their morphology. A large proportion of the individuals examined (71.43%) were positive for gastrointestinal parasites of 7 different genera; three identified families of nematodes: Ancylosmotatidae (42.86%), Strongyloididae (38.10%) and Toxocaridae (4.76%); three of protozoans: Balantiiididae (19.05%), Blastocystis sp. (4.76%) and Entamoeba sp. (4.76%) and  an unidentified nematode egg. The most prevalent parasites are Strongyloides sp. and hookworm-like eggs which both have zoonotic importance in both primates and human. Parasite richness on semi-captive orangutans in BMOUI were higher than captive orangutans in TZNS (p=0.031). The result showed that  orangutan harbored various gastrointestinal parasitic infections of zoonotic importance. Identification of parasites infecting these orangutans could help restore and improve the health of the endangered species and further improve the welfare of orangutans in captivity based on their ecological needs. It is therefore advised that strategic and sustained broad-spectrum anthelminthic therapy should be carried out among the orangutan for long-term survival of the species.
Keywords: Gastrointestinal parasites, Bornean orangutan, captive orangutan, Pongo pygmaeus, nematode
Requires Audio or Video system for Presentation?: No