MSPTM 2019 Annual Scientific Conference
13 - 14 March 2019
InterContinental Kuala Lumpur

Abstract

Title

POST-ERA MDA: REVISITING INTESTINAL PARASITIC INFECTIONS AMONG THE URBAN POOR COMMUNITIES IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

Type
E-Poster Presentation
Theme
Scaling Up Efforts in Tropical Disease and Vector Control through Evidence-Based Research
Topic
Neglected Tropical Diseases

Authors

Main Author
Norhidayu Sahimin1
Presenting Author
Norhidayu Sahimin1
Co-Author
Nur Sabrina Abd Khalil1
Siti Nursheena Mohd Zain1

Authors' Institution

Department / Institution / Country
Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science / University of Malaya / Malaysia1
Content
Abstract Content

Soil Transmitted Helminths (STHs) have been recognized as a major public health problem in low socioeconomic communities worldwide. National helminth control programmes through mass drug administration (MDA) was initiated in Malaysia in 1974 to eradicate STHs until it was discontinued in 1983. The Ministry of Health Malaysia control strategy was an integrated national environment program that included education, sanitation and anthelminthic treatment to school going children only. Therefore, this study was conducted to re-assess STHs infection 30 years after discontinuation of MDA program among the urban poor communities of PPR flats and urban slums in the states of Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, Selangor and Malacca with the objectives to determine the current prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection and associated risk factors. A total of 206 stool samples were successfully collected and screened for both helminth and protozoan infections using formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique and Ziehl-Neelsen’s staining method. Overall, 18.9% (n=39) infections were recorded among the residents with at least one helminth (n=35, 17%) and, or protozoan (n=21, 10.2%). The roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides was the most dominant helminth species (n=32, 15.5%), followed by the cestode Hymenolepis nana (n=1; 0.5%). While protozoan infections included Cryptosporidium spp. (n=20, 9.7%) and Giardia sp. (n=1, 0.5%). None of the risk factors (intrinsic and extrinsic) were significantly associated with infections. The low prevalence in the study cohort is indicative of the government’s successful effort to provide of clean water sources and good sanitation facilities to the general population at large in addition to good personal hygiene practices.

 
Keywords: Soil Transmitted Helminths; urban poor communities; Peninsular Malaysia
Requires Audio or Video system for Presentation?: No