MSPTM 2019 Annual Scientific Conference
13 - 14 March 2019
InterContinental Kuala Lumpur

Abstract

Title

INSECT ACTIVITIES AND SOIL CHEMISTRY PROFILES ASSOCIATED WITH CALF AND RABBIT CARCASSES DECOMPOSITION PROCESSES IN PUNJAB, INDIA.

Type
Oral Presentation
Theme
Scaling Up Efforts in Tropical Disease and Vector Control through Evidence-Based Research
Topic
Medical & Forensic Entomology

Authors

Main Author
Sarabjit Singh1
Presenting Author
Sarabjit Singh1
Co-Author
Madhu Bala2

Authors' Institution

Department / Institution / Country
Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine / Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) / Malaysia1
Zoology and Environmental Sciences / Punjabi University / India2
Content
Abstract Content

In forensic investigations, soil evidence can be used to locate the types of crime scenes while insect evidence can be utilized to estimate minimum post-mortem interval (mPMI).A preliminary study of carcass decomposition was conducted using a calf (~20 kg) and rabbit (~2.5 kg) carcasses in February and March 2018 at Dasuya, Punjab, with the mean temperature 24±1°C and 38±1°C, respectively. The calf carcass took a total of 27 days for complete skeletonozation stage whereas rabbit carcass took nine days. For soil chemical analyses, soil beneath the carcasses were taken from three different depths, i.e., 0-5cm (top layer), 6-10 cm (middle layer) and 11-15 cm (bottom layer).Insect larvae and adults were collected throughout decomposition stages and brought to the laboratory for identification. The results demonstrated that three dipteran families were collected from both carcasses:-Sarcophagidae (Sarcophaga sp.), Muscidae (Musca domestica) and Calliphoridae (Chrysomya megacephala, C. rufifacies). Furthermore, three families of Coleoptera were recovered namely Histeridae (Saprinus interruptus), Cleridae (Necrobia rufipes), and Dermestidae (Dermestes maculatus). The soil pH was gradually decreased until active decay stage and increased thereafter. Electrical conductivity of soil was increased up to the skeletal stage. Moisture content was gradually increased until active decay stage and decreased following the skeletal stage of decomposition. Similarly, soil-extractable phosphorus, total nitrogen and total carbon of soil was increased until the advanced decay stage and decreased during the skeletal stage. We concluded that the soil physiochemical and ecological succession of forensic insects might be useful in locating the site of corpse decomposition as well as the time elapsed after death.

 

Keywords:
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