MSPTM 2019 Annual Scientific Conference
13 - 14 March 2019
InterContinental Kuala Lumpur

Abstract

Title

PARASITIC INFECTION IN RODENTS CAUGHT AT FOUR DIFFERENT AREAS IN UPM CAMPUS

Type
E-Poster Presentation
Theme
Scaling Up Efforts in Tropical Disease and Vector Control through Evidence-Based Research
Topic
Medical Microbiology & Parasitology

Authors

Main Author
Tijjani Mustapha1
Presenting Author
Tijjani Mustapha1
Co-Author
Zasmy Unyah1
Roslaini Abd Majid1
Mohammed Nasiru Wana1
Sharif Alhassan Abdullah1

Authors' Institution

Department / Institution / Country
Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences / Universiti Putra Malaysia / Malaysia1
Content
Abstract Content

Rodents constitute more than 42% of the known mammalian species with 1700 species which belongs to three different families include Muridae, Microtidae and Sigmodontidae. They are involved in the transmission of more than 60 infectious diseases to humans such as toxoplasmosis, trichinellosis and capillariasis. The potential of zoonotic transmission of rodent-borne diseases to humans remains a threat in public health problem. The objective of this study is to identify the species of intestinal parasites in rodents and determined the prevalence of the infection in some selected areas in UPM. Rodents were caught using live traps from four different colleges in UPM. Various organs such as brain, liver, kidney, spleen, lungs, muscle and intestine were sent for histopathology. The faecal samples were concentrated using Formalin-ether concentration method and were preserved in Para-Pak Eco-Fix and 10% formal saline solution for later identification. A total of 89 wild rats that comprises three species were captured, Rattus rattus diadii, Rattus norvegicus and Rattus tiomaticus. 19.1% were found to be infected with Hymenolepis nana, 16.8% Hymenolepis diminuta, 22.4% Aspicularis tetraptera, 23.5% Synphacia obvelata, 12.3% Strongyloides ratti, 12.3% Trichiuris spp. 11.2% Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, 12.3% Heterakis spumosa, 26.9% Giardia muris, 14.6%, Entamoeba muris, 8.9% Cryptosporidium spp., and 21.3 % Morniliformis morniliformis. Our findings indicate that rodents in the study can act as reservoir hosts for parasites and these parasites may have a potential risk associated with human disease.

Keywords: Rodent; parasite; parasitic infection: zoonotic; reservoir hosts
Requires Audio or Video system for Presentation?: No